Sugarlaws: Living Sweetly.

Cornbread

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November 11th, 2007 · Print Print

Here’s the thing about cornbread. It’s basically just a loaf of corn muffins. Which is probably why it’s so good. But that makes me wonder: blueberry bread? Does that exist already? I’ll keep pondering. Maybe I’m better off just making muffins, but it might be worth an experiment…

These were great, and SO easy! This is a really, really light recipe — you can even add a few pats of (forthcoming) basil butter, guilt-free. However, since most of its moistness comes from the milk, and not oil, it won’t keep very well. Eat it within a day or two, and make sure it’s stored in an airtight container. This would be a great brunch side dish, or you could use it as a dinner appetizer, like I did. Delicious!

Here’s what it looked like in the dish — irresistible!

Cornbread

INGREDIENTS:
1 1/2 cups cornmeal
2 1/2 cups milk
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup white sugar
2 eggs
1/4 cup canola oil

DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. In a medium bowl, combine cornmeal and milk.
3. Grease a medium-size baking dish, or two smaller dishes.
4. In a large bowl, mix flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Add the cornmeal mixture, eggs and oil and whisk until smooth. Pour batter into prepared pan(s).
3. Bake for 35 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Makes about 24 slices.


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Tags: breads · food



2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Dickson // Apr 30, 2008 at 7:59 am

    What you have here, dear, is cornCAKE, not cornbread. No self-respecting Southerner would put sugar or flour in anything called cornbread. Buttermilk or sour milk would be the choice for liquid. Salt would be used more sparingly. We old-timers also save the eggs for other dishes, in honor of thrifty ancestors for whom cornpone was a staple. Drippings from cooked pig are also superior to the oil for flavor and economy – heat in a skillet, carefully pour the melted fat into the batter, stir, and then fill the hot skillet with the batter and bake on high heat to produce the proper crusty exterior.

  • 2 katy // Apr 30, 2008 at 3:43 pm

    Oh excellent!!!  I will definitely have to try my hand at real authentic cornbread — now where can I get my hands on some pig drippings…. !

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